Collection: MS 534: Thomas Scattergood Collection

Archive Collection icon Archive Collection: Thomas Scattergood Collection

Please note: This item may not be available for use. Please contact Special Collections before your visit. See the Access and usage section below for further details.

Details

Title: Thomas Scattergood Collection

Level: Collection 

Classmark: MS 534

Creator(s): Scattergood, Thomas (1826-1900)

Date: 1846-1897

Main language: English

Size and medium: 3 volumes, 3 envelopes

Persistent link: https://explore.library.leeds.ac.uk/special-collections-explore/5225 

Collection group(s): Medical Collections

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Description

Contains three volumes of notebooks by Thomas Scattergood of medical case histories; and a file of notes for lectures on forensic medicine.

The notebooks of case histories contain details of various medico-legal cases Scattergood worked on, with information on the forensic and toxicological testing he undertook on evidence presented to him for many criminal cases.

Administrative or biographical history

Thomas Scattergood (1826-1900) was a surgeon, toxicologist and lecturer from Huddersfield. He began studying to become a surgeon apothecary in 1845 at the Leeds School of Medicine, which had opened in 1831. In 1846 he was appointed to the post of assistant apothecary at the Leeds General Infirmary. He continued in this post until 1850 when he obtained his MRCS and LSA qualifications.

The following year Scattergood went into general practice and also worked as an analytical chemist. The same year, he became Lecturer in Chemistry at the Leeds School of Medicine; he held various posts at the School for the next half a century. Between 1869 and 1888 he lectured in Forensic Medicine and Toxicology, his expertise in this field was called on many times for forensic testing of evidence in legal cases – most notably he was involved in convicting Mary Ann Cotton for serial murder in 1873.

In addition to his work at the School, Scattergood was appointed as honorary surgeon to the Hospital for Women and Children, Leeds in 1863 until 1889. One of his key achievements was his work leading on the amalgamation of the Leeds School of Medicine with the Yorkshire College in 1884, upon which he became the first Dean of the new Faculty of Medicine.

Scattergood married Miss Haigh on 31 May 1854; they went on to have six children. Two of their sons, Arthur Kimberley and Oliver, also went on to practice medicine. Scattergood died in Leeds in February 1900.


Source: S.T. Anning & W.K.J. Walls, A History of the Leeds School of Medicine: One and a Half Centuries 1831-1981, (Leeds University Press: 1982);
British Medical Journal, ‘Obituary: Thomas Scattergood, M.R.C.S., L.S.A.’ 3 Mar 1900, 1 (2044), p. 547.

Provenance

The manuscripts were transferred from the Medical Library in July 1981.

Previously, the notebooks of medical case histories were catalogued under a separate reference number from the notes for lectures on forensic medicine (MS 684) - these have now all be brought under the same reference number of MS 534.

Catalogued as part of the Wellcome Trust-funded Medical Collections Project (2015-2018).

Arrangement

The volumes of medical case histories have been listed first, in volume order, followed by the addition of the notes for lectures on forensic medicine (original reference MS 684).

Access and usage

Please note: This item may not be available for use. Please contact Special Collections before your visit.

Access

Access to this material is unrestricted.

Users are advised that this material contains detailed descriptions of forensic testing, medical examinations of individuals, and autopsies, often for serious criminal cases, which may be upsetting for readers.

Reproduction

Material in this collection is in copyright. Photocopies or digital images can only be supplied by the Library for research or private study within the terms of copyright legislation. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain the copyright holder's permission to reproduce for any other purpose. Guidance is available on tracing copyright status and ownership.

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Related subjects

WARNING: many of our records have not been classified by subject. So if you search our catalogue by subject using the links below then you are unlikely to find all relevant records. But you will find some...

Jurisprudence

Forensic Toxicology

Forensic medicine

Lecture Notes

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