Archive Collection icon Archive Collection: Robert Louis Stevenson, correspondence and literary manuscripts

Details

Title: Robert Louis Stevenson, correspondence and literary manuscripts

Level: Collection 

Classmark: BC MS 19c Stevenson

Creator(s): Stevenson, Robert Louis (1850-1894)

Date: 1898-1923

Main language: English

Size and medium: 3 vols, 1 box, and 1 envelope, manuscript and typescript

Persistent link: https://explore.library.leeds.ac.uk/special-collections-explore/7440 

Collection group(s): English Literature

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Description

Comprises: (1) 1 box containing 2 vols and 1 other separate volume of copies of letters by Katharine D. Osborne concerning Robert Louis Stevenson, 1922-1923; (2) Correspondence between Sidney Colvin, Lloyd Osborne (Osbourne), Mrs Stevenson, etc., with reference to the writing of 'The life of Robert Louis Stevenson', 1898-1899, holograph manuscripts and typescripts, 1 vol.; (3) 'The hanging judge', by Robert Louis Stevenson, original typescript from which the book was published with holograph manuscript of Edmund Gosse's introduction, 1914, 1 vol.; (4) Copy of 5 unpublished poems by Robert Louis Stevenson in Sir E.W. Gosse's hand, made in 1903, held in 1 envelope (5) 'If This Were Faith' and 'Along the Uneven Beach' rough manuscript drafts for two poems in Stevenson's hand. 'Along the Uneven Beach' has a rough sketch of groundplans for a house on the reverse.

Item (2) is finely bound in dark blue half leather on boards with gilt lettering embossed on the spine as follows: CORRESPONDENCE BETWEEN SIDNEY COLVIN AND LLOYD OSBOURNE ETC. 1898-1899; (3) and (5) are similarly bound and embossed as follows:

(3) THE HANGING JUDGE - ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON ORIGINAL TYPESCRIPT GOSSE'S INTRODUCTION HOLOGRAPH MS.

(5) ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON/MANUSCRIPTS/IF THIS WERE FAITH/ALONG THE UNEVEN BEACH

Administrative or biographical history

Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894), author and traveller, was the son of Thomas Stevenson of Edinburgh and entered Edinburgh University in 1867 as the pupil of Fleeming Jenkin. After abandoning the study of engineering and law he began to travel widely. Though very ill he wrote stories and essays, and in 1880 married Mrs Osbourne. He established his position as an author with 'The strange case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde' and 'Kidnapped' in 1886. After further travels in the Pacific he died suddenly from a brain haemorrhage and was buried on Mount Vaea. For a full assessment of his life and work see the 'Dictionary of National Biography'.

Access and usage

Access

Access to this part of the collection is restricted under the Data Protection Act. You will need to complete a restricted access form and return it to Special Collections for review by staff before access can be granted.

The letters by Katharine D. Osborne concerning Robert Louis Stevenson may only be consulted at the discretion of the Keeper of the Brotherton Collection

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Related subjects

WARNING: many of our records have not been classified by subject. So if you search our catalogue by subject using the links below then you are unlikely to find all relevant records. But you will find some...

Letters

English literature

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