Archive Collection icon Archive Collection: Thomas De Quincey, autobiographical fragment concerning his diet and health

Details

Title: Thomas De Quincey, autobiographical fragment concerning his diet and health

Level: Collection 

Classmark: BC MS 19c De Quincey

Creator(s): De Quincey, Thomas (1785-1859)

Date: 1837

Main language: English

Size and medium: Single sheet holograph manuscript

Persistent link: https://explore.library.leeds.ac.uk/special-collections-explore/7377 

Collection group(s): English Literature

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Administrative or biographical history

Thomas De Quincey (1785-1859), the son of a Manchester merchant, was educated at Oxford where it is believed that his life-long addiction to opium began. He was acquainted with key Romantic writers including Coleridge and Wordsworth. In 1817 he married Peggy Simpson, a farmer's daughter with whom he had 3 daughters and 5 sons. He wrote principally for periodicals, including The London Magazine, Blackwood's and The Quarterly. His best-known work, 'Confessions of an Opium Eater', was originally serialised in 'The London Magazine' in 1821.

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