Collection: BC MS 20c Enitharmon: Archives of The Enitharmon Press

Archive Collection icon Archive Collection: Archives of The Enitharmon Press

Details

Title: Archives of The Enitharmon Press

Level: Collection 

Classmark: BC MS 20c Enitharmon

Date: 1967-2014

Persistent link: https://explore.library.leeds.ac.uk/special-collections-explore/499846 

Collection group(s): English Literature

Referencing help | Visit Special Collections

Description

The archive includes material from the early years of 'The Enitharmon Press' through to the present day. It represents the tenures of both Alan Clodd and Stephen Stuart-Smith.

The collection includes a considerable amount of correspondence, largely between Clodd, Stuart-Smith and the writers and artists associated with the Press. The collection also includes a large number of proofs, layouts and publication designs.

The collection is not catalogued in detail and is subject to review.

Administrative or biographical history

Enitharmon was founded in 1967 by Alan Clodd and began publishing in 1969 as an independent poetry press. Under Alan Clodd's stewardship Enitharmon published over 150 titles, with new and emerging writers as well as older and established poets. Enitharmon contributors include Kathleen Raine, Paula Rego, David Gascoyne, Lawrence Sail, Edward Upward, Vernon Watkins, Gilbert and George and John Heath-Stubbs.

Enitharmon produces poetry at its core, but also literary criticisms, memoirs and translations. They have also produced a series of limited-edition chapbooks and artists’ books. Post 1987, following the succession from Alan Clodd to Stephen Stuart-Smith, the company increased their output of artists’ work.

Originally run out of Alan Clodd's home in East Finchley, Enitharmon moved to Kentish Town in 2001. At the same time, the company Enitharmon Editions was established as an art focused sister company to Enitharmon Press. In 2013, Enitharmon moved from Kentish town to Bloomsbury where the company continues to publish and maintain strong personal relationships with its artists and writers. The nature of which can be seen throughout the innumerable emails, letters and postcards held in the collection.


Sources:
Stephen Stuart-Smith, 'Enitharmon Editions', Parenthesis, issue 28, Spring 2015.

The Enitharmon Press, http://www.enitharmon.co.uk/about_us.asp [accessed 29/09/2016].

Access and usage

Access

Some parts of this collection have not been listed in detail and access may be restricted under the Data Protection Act and other relevant legislation. Please consult the relevant part of the catalogue for specific details. Where a detailed record does not exist, please contact Special Collections. Upon receipt of your request, a member of the team will discuss your requirements with you and review relevant material accordingly.

Material in this collection is in copyright. Photocopies or digital images can only be supplied by the Library for research or private study within the terms of copyright legislation. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain the copyright holder's permission to reproduce for any other purpose. Guidance is available on tracing copyright status and ownership.

Visit Special Collections

Collection hierarchy 

What is an archive hierarchy?

Catalogues of archives are usually arranged in hierarchies - one hierarchy for each collection in the archive. The details on display will be of a record at a particular level of the hierarchy. There may be other records above, below, or alongside this record in the same hierarchy. The full hierarchy is shown below.

Learn more about archive hierarchies

What is an archive hierarchy?

Books, manuscripts and archives in Special Collections are usually grouped together in collections. Catalogue records for individual objects link to a collection record, which show the object's context, and associated material.

You can see the full hierarchy under 'In this collection'.

Learn more about archive hierarchies

What is the Level?

Catalogues of archives are usually arranged in hierarchies - one hierarchy for each collection in the archive. The details on display will be of a record at a particular level of the hierarchy. There may be other records above, below, or alongside this record in the same hierarchy. You can see the full hierarchy under 'In this collection'.

Learn more about archive hierarchies


Collection hierarchy 

Contact us