Collection: SC MS Smithells: Arthur Smithells correspondence and papers

Archive Collection icon Archive Collection: Arthur Smithells correspondence and papers

Details

Title: Arthur Smithells correspondence and papers

Level: Collection 

Classmark: SC MS Smithells

Creator(s): Smithells, Arthur (1860-1939)

Date: 1875-1955

Size and medium: 3 boxes

Persistent link: https://explore.library.leeds.ac.uk/special-collections-explore/167050 

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Description

Arthur Smithells (1860-1939) was born at Bury in Lancashire. He graduated in chemistry at Owen's College, Manchester, in 1881 (BSc, London) and subsequently continued his training in Heidelberg, under R B von Bunsen and in Munich. He returned to Manchester as an assistant lecturer in 1883 but in 1885 was appointed professor of chemistry at the Yorkshire College in Leeds. Here he not only pursued his research into the structure of flames, which was his main contribution to pure science, but also played a full part in the broader development of the College and of the University of Leeds which it became in 1904. He was elected FRS in 1901 and was vice-president of the Royal Society in 1916. In 1913-1914 he was a special visiting lecturer in chemistry at the Punjab University, Lahore. In the First World War he offered his services as an instructor in scientific matters to the Northern Command and soon became (1916-1919) chief chemical adviser on anti-gas training for the Home Forces, with an office in the Horse Guards in London. He was granted the honorary rank of lieutenant-colonel, and was appointed CMG in 1918 in recognition of his services. He resigned his chair at Leeds in 1923 to become the director of the Salters' Institute of Industrial Chemistry in London, and subsequently he was president of the Institute of Chemistry from 1927 to 1930. He devoted much time in his later years to encouraging the training of chemists and to arousing public concern at the dangers of chemical warfare and the need to make preparations against it. The items listed below comprise three separate collections, received from different sources at different times. Part 1 comprises MS 391 and was received from Professor Arthur Smithells', son in 1975. The material in Part 2 is shelved with other printed books and pamphlets in the Personalia section of Special Collections: University of Leeds, and was acquired by purchase in 1958. Part 3 (attached as a .pdf) lists other items referring to Professor Arthur Smithells which the Library has acquired from time to time from various sources.

Administrative or biographical history

Arthur Smithells (1860-1939) was born at Bury in Lancashire. He graduated in chemistry at Owen's College, Manchester, in 1881 (B.Sc., London), and continued his training in Heidelberg, under R.B. von Bunsen, and in Munich. He returned to Manchester as an assistant lecturer in 1883 but in 1885 was appointed professor of chemistry at the Yorkshire College in Leeds. Here he not only pursued his research into the structure of flames, which was his main contribution to pure science, but also played a full part in the broader development of the College and of the University of Leeds which it became in 1904. He was elected FRS in 1901 and was vice-president of the Royal Society in 1916. In 1913-14 he was a special visiting lecturer in chemistry at the Punjab University, Lahore. In the First World War he offered his services as an instructor in scientific matters to the Northern Command and soon became (1916-19) chief chemical adviser on anti-gas training for the Home Forces, with an office in the Horse Guards in London. He was granted the honorary rank of lieutenant-colonel, and was appointed C.M.G. in 1918 in recognition of his services. He resigned his chair at Leeds in 1923 to become the director of the Salters' Institute of Industrial Chemistry in London, and subsequently he was president of the Institute of Chemistry from 1927 to 1930. He devoted much time in his later years to encouraging the training of chemists and to arousing public concern at the dangers of chemical warfare and the need to make preparations against it.

Arrangement

The MS 391 and MS 416 catalogues are based on an historic inventories. The arrangement of material does not necessarily represent the original order of the archive and it is considered partly processed by an archivist. When making requests to consult, please be aware that there may be discrepancies between description and physical arrangement. The retrievable unit for this collection is file level.

Access and usage

Access

Some parts of this collection have not been listed in detail and access may be restricted under the Data Protection Act and other relevant legislation. Please consult the relevant part of the catalogue for specific details. Where a detailed record does not exist, please contact Special Collections. Upon receipt of your request, a member of the team will discuss your requirements with you and review relevant material accordingly.

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Catalogues of archives are usually arranged in hierarchies - one hierarchy for each collection in the archive. The details on display will be of a record at a particular level of the hierarchy. There may be other records above, below, or alongside this record in the same hierarchy. You can see the full hierarchy under 'In this collection'.

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Collection hierarchy 

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