Archive Collection icon Archive Collection: Marrick Priory, Swaledale, North Yorkshire, Estate Archive

Details

Title: Marrick Priory, Swaledale, North Yorkshire, Estate Archive

Level: Collection 

Classmark: BC Marrick Priory

Creator(s): Marrick Priory

Date: 1170-1812

Main language: English; Latin

Persistent link: https://explore.library.leeds.ac.uk/special-collections-explore/114284 

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Description

The remote manor of Marrick in Swaledale, North Yorkshire, was most notable for centuries for the mining of lead in its vicinity which was being undertaken by the time of the Norman conquest. A document authored by Roger de Aske to Roger, Archbishop of York, records the foundation of Marrick Priory as a priory for Benedictine nuns between 1154 and 1158, and there is evidence that it was substantially supported by income deriving from the local lead mines. In 1540 the Priory's closure was brought about by Henry VIII's dissolution of the monasteries when the prioress and 16 nuns were evicted. It was leased and then purchased by Sir John Uvedale, also known as Sir John Woodhall, former secretary to Anne Boleyn, and then secretary of the council of the North. . Ownership passed to Sir Timothy, Hutton of Marske in 1592. It was subsequently sold to the Blackburn family of Blackburn Hall by his son Matthew in 1633. A complex history of changing ownership of the surrounding lands continued until the nineteenth century decline of lead production in the area and the consequent decline on population. The church itself was abandoned after the end of the Second World War. It subsequently became an outdoor activity and residential centre.

Arranged by period of ownership and comprises section1 Stapleton (13thc-19th C) - 257 documents; section 2 Marrick Priory (1170-1538) - 20 documents; section 3 Uvedale (1540-1592) - 100 documents; Brackenbury Hutton Purchase (1589-1599) - 13 documents; and Blackburne (1596-1743) - 530 documents.

See attached multimedia for further handlist information.

Administrative or biographical history

The remote manor of Marrick in Swaledale, North Yorkshire, was most notable for centuries for the mining of lead in its vicinity. Although the evidence for lead mining there during the Roman occupation is slight, it was certainly being undertaken by the time of the Norman conquest. A century later, in about 1165, a priory for Benedictine nuns was established at Marrick, substantially supported by income deriving from the local lead mines. In 1540 the Priory's closure was brought about by Henry VIII's dissolution of the monasteries. A complex history of changing ownership of the valuable surrounding lands then began, continuing until the nineteenth century decline of lead production in the area.

Provenance

Purchased by Lord Brotherton as part of his private collection and bequeathed to the University of Leeds.

Access and usage

Access

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Collection hierarchy 

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